Further Reading

Further Reading

Research and Resources for Educators

Academic Books

Dewey, J., 1938. Experience and Education. Reprint. London: Free Press 2015 “How shall the young become acquainted with the past in such a way that the acquaintance is a potent agent in appreciation of the living present?” (Dewey, 1938, p.23).

“If an experience arouses curiosity, strengthens initiative, and sets up desires and purposes that are sufficiently intense to carry a person over dead places in the future, continuity works in a very different way” (Dewey, 1938, p.38).

McCarthy, C., Crichlow, W., Dimitriadis, G., Dolby, N., eds. 2005. Race, Identity and Representation in Education. London: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group

“Worldliness is therefore the restoration to such works and interpretations of their place in the global setting, a restoration that can only be accomplished by an appreciation not of some tiny, defensively constituted corner of the world but of the large, many-windowed house of human culture as a whole”(Said, 2005, p.459).

Gilory P., 1993. The Black Atlantic. London: Verso

“[These themes] are especially important in the history of the black Atlantic, where movement, relocation, displacement, and restlessness are the norms rather than the exceptions and where, as we have already seen, there are long histories of associations of self-exploration with the exploration of new territories and the cultural differences that exist both between and within the groups that get called races” (Gilroy, 1993, p.133).

Dewey, J., 1938. Experience and Education. Reprint. London: Free Press 2015

“How shall the young become acquainted with the past in such a way that the acquaintance is a potent agent in appreciation of the living present?” (Dewey, 1938, p.23). “If an experience arouses curiosity, strengthens initiative, and sets up desires and purposes that are sufficiently intense to carry a person over dead places in the future, continuity works in a very different way” (Dewey, 1938, p.38).

Learning Resources

Runnymede Guide for Teachers

An essential guide to teaching inclusive history with guidance around using the local area and oracy as ways to connect to global history.

Quigley C., 2018. Closing the Vocabulary Gap. London: Routledge

In Closing the Vocabulary Gap, the author explores the increased demands of an academic curriculum and how closing the vocabulary gap between our ‘word poor’ and ‘word rich’ students could prove the vital difference between school failure and success.

Gaunt A. and Stott A., 2019. Transform Teaching and Learning through Talk . London: Rowman and Littlefield

Developing cultural capital through oracy

Exhibition in a Box: The Missing Chapter

Exhibition in a Box: The Missing Chapter A free resource provided by Autograph ABP that promotes cultural diversity through photography.

Websites and News Articles

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